How To Convert a Deta Doorbell to a Ring Doorbell Pro – UK

When I purchased my Ring Doorbell Pro, I knew that I currently had a Deta doorbell but I hadn’t looked at the wiring much beyond that. To be honest, I intended on getting an electrician in to install it. But now that the country is locked down due to COVID-19 and a smart doorbell isn’t really essential business, I have spent a bunch of time exploring how to install the Pro myself.

As it turns out, I have the Deta C3501 doorbell which is fairly common in newer UK houses. It is a mains voltage doorbell, meaning that a full 230V AC will go from your consumer unit to your Deta transformer/chime unit somewhere on your wall. Many of the other Deta models (C3500 and C3504 spring to mind) are also mains voltage doorbells, powered in the same way – and so this guide should help you out if you have one of these other models too.

Anywhoo, the broad steps for converting to a Ring Doorbell Pro are:

  1. Look at your current doorbell, and consider if you’re keeping the existing chime.
  2. Check the Ring instructions and plan out how you will make the conversion.
  3. … do the actual work!
  4. Add/setup your device in the app.

This guide covers each of these three steps in detail, but if you prefer video format then feel to check out the below as well:

Step 1 – check your current doorbell

Check the current wiring

Firstly, go to your consumer unit and turn off the power to your doorbell. If you’re like me, you may have a separate ‘Doorbell’ switch which you can easily turn off:

A metal consumer unit showing the labelled parts, including the 'Bell' and 'Ground Floor Lighting' switches.
My consumer unit has a separate ‘Bell’ switch, but your doorbell may be powered by ‘Ground Floor Lighting’ instead.

If not, your bell is probably powered by the ground floor lights but if you’re not sure, carefully turn each switch off and use a voltage test pen to verify that the power is now off:

Using a voltage pen or similar device to check that I've successfully turned off the electric supply to the Deta doorbell unit.
Use a voltage pen or similar device to check that you’ve successfully turned off the electric supply.

Once you’ve isolated the relevant consumer unit switch and turned off the power, take the cover off your wall-mounted Deta transformer/chime unit (this can be a big stiff at first but it will come off eventually):

A labelled Deta C3501 doorbell transformer/chime wall-mounted unit, showing the incoming 230V cable on the bottom left and the outgoing CAT5 cable on the bottom right.
A labelled Deta C3501 unit showing the input and output cables.

As described, the bottom left cable is the mains voltage input cable (230V AC) coming from the consumer unit into the Deta transformer/chime unit. The bottom right cable is actually a CAT5 cable, with the blue/white and orange/white strands in use being the output cables going to the doorbell.

Your wiring may look a little different, and the output cable may use 1mm (or similar) twin+earth wiring instead of CAT5 cable. But either way, the main thing is the bottom left cable is thicker and is an input, and the bottom right cable is thinner and is the output.

Decide whether to keep your existing chime

The Ring Doorbell Pro comes with a Chime Pro, which plugs into your wall plug and works wirelessly. When the Pro is clicked, the Chime Pro will chime – along with any Echo devices in your house.

However an alternative option is to try and keep your existing hardwired doorbell, which essentially means bypassing the ‘doorbell pressed’ cabling (but keeping the solenoid/chime cabling), using the ‘doorbell bypass kit’ included in your Pro box.

Before you consider this route, however, you need to check the Ring Video Doorbell Chime Kit Compatibility List.

One thing you’ll quickly notice on that page is that zero Deta models which Ring tested are compatible. In other words, for this purpose of this guide (covering changing a Deta doorbell to a Ring Pro), you can’t use the existing chime part of the wall-mounted Deta unit.

To be honest, this is good news for me because I like clean solutions (I can rip out the Deta doorbell completely, if I want), and I was always planning on using the Chime Pro and my existing 3 Echo devices to notify me of a doorbell click.

Okay, with this decided, we can move onto step 2 – planning.

Step 2 – plan out your wiring

Firstly I’ll be removing the existing Deta doorbell completely. After all, I can’t use the chime part of it, and I don’t want the transformer aspect (as it likely delivers only a tiny amount of power to the actual doorbell). I could rip everything out of it and leave the empty box, and house the Ring transformer in this.

The downside of this is that the Ring transformer would effectively be loose inside the Deta unit, which is a bad idea – especially since it’s supplied with 230V mains voltage! The Ring transformer is actually designed to be mounted on a DIN rail, which is the metal or plastic rail inside a consumer unit (you’ll see this if you take the cover off the consumer unit – don’t do this unless you know what you’re doing!).

As a result, I bought a Wylex ESE2 enclosure which fits the Ring transformer perfectly and it has a DIN rail:

The Ring transformer in a Wylex ESE2 DIN-rail enclosure.
The Ring transformer in a Wylex ESE2 DIN-rail enclosure.

Great, next up is the wiring itself. I have a neutral (blue) and live (brown) wire in the bottom left, which are the inputs. These will go into the bottom of the transformer in positions “5” and “6”.

Then the two twisted pairs (blue/white and orange/white) – which are the outputs going to the Ring doorbell – will come out of positions “1” and “4”. This would be perfectly adequate to power the Ring Pro, and hence our wiring would look like this:

A diagram showing a possible wiring plan for my Ring Doorbell Pro, going from the consumer unit to the Ring Pro (with the Ring transformer in the middle).
A possible wiring plan for my Ring Doorbell Pro… not to scale!

However, remember the ‘bypass kit’ in your blue installation box? Well if you take the sticker off it (why wouldn’t you?!…), it actually says “Ring Pro Power Kit V2”. If you Google this, Ring’s support page says that one of the output cables should go through this.

This is because the Pro Power Kit V2 contains a self-resetting fuse, in other words it acts as a circuit breaker. If there’s an electrical short or similar issue when your Pro is installed, this circuit breaker will kick in and the circuit will trip. Then you can reset the circuit in your consumer unit, and the Pro will carry on working fine.

This is much better than your Doorbell Pro getting damaged! It’s frustrating that this really crucial information isn’t clear from the Ring user guides, and that the “Pro Power Kit V2” is hidden by a ‘bypass kit’ sticker (even though many people – including me – won’t be bypassing an existing doorbell). Nonetheless, it’s good to know and it means that the end wiring diagram for converting a Deta C3051 to a Ring Doorbell Pro will be:

A diagram showing the final wiring plan for my Ring Doorbell Pro, going from the consumer unit to the Ring Pro (with the Ring transformer in the middle, and the bypass/power kit included).
The final wiring plan for the Pro, including the ‘Pro Power Kit V2’ (or ‘Bypass Kit’) in the output cabling.

Step 3 – do the actual work!

Firstly I stripped back the existing doorbell, completely removing it from the wall and leaving behind the input and output cable:

An old Deta C3501 doorbell, after removing it from the wall.
My old Deta C3501 doorbell, after removing it from the wall.
Two cables sticking out of a hole in the wall - one is a mains input cable, the other is a CAT5 output cable.
The two cables (input and output) sticking out of a hole in the wall.

Then I fed the cables into the back of the Wylex enclosure (through the DIN rail holes) and fit the back onto the wall – luckily it had the same screw hole positions as the Deta doorbell so I didn’t need to drill extra mounting points:

The back of a Wylex ESE2 enclosure has been mounted, with the input and output cables fed into the bottom and top.
The back of a Wylex ESE2 enclosure has been mounted, with the input and output cables fed into the bottom and top.

I then had to wire everything up, but cutting the blue twisted pair output cable in-situ (to include it in the Pro Power Kit) would have been tricky, so instead I butchered an existing CAT5 cable and took some extra blue/white twisted pair from here:

A cut-in-half CAT5 cable, with the Ring transformer and Pro Power Kit V2 also pictured. The power kit has a blue/white cable sticking out of it.
I was lazy and didn’t want to splice the existing CAT5 cable at its height, so instead I butchered a CAT5 cable and stole some cabling from here!

Then I could wire up the transformer and put the front of the Wylex enclosure back on:

The overall Wylex enclosure with the Ring transformer inside, and all the cabling shown.
The finished Wylex enclosure with the Ring transformer inside, and all the cabling shown.
A close-up look at the input cables at the bottom of the Ring transformer, with the earth in a terminal block.
A close-up look at the input cables at the bottom of the Ring transformer, with the earth in a terminal block.
A close-up look at the output cables at the top of the Ring transformer, with position "1" going through the Pro Power Kit V2, and position "4" coming straight from the output (doorbell) cable.
A close-up look at the output cables at the top of the Ring transformer.
Finished Wylex ESE2 enclosure with the RIng transformer poking out, and the front cover put back on.
The finished Wylex ESE2 enclosure with the RIng transformer poking out.

That’s it for the tricky (internal) bit, now let’s go outside. I removed the white cover off my doorbell to see:

An outdoor traditional doorbell, with the white front cover removed.
My outdoor traditional Deta doorbell, with the white front cover removed.

I then removed this second cover/push button enclosure and removed the wiring to get:

A removed doorbell, showing the two supply wires (blue and orange twisted pairs).
A removed doorbell, showing the two supply wires (blue and orange twisted pairs).

I then wired up the Doorbell Pro, all straightforward enough:

A Ring Doorbell Pro suspended in mid-air by the wired-up supply cables.
A Ring Doorbell Pro suspended in mid-air by the wired-up supply cables… I hope they’re not loose! (Spoiler: they weren’t).

Mounting it – onto my wooden frame – is simple, no drilling needed – just screwing in the two provided screws:

A Ring Pro attached to a door frame, but without the faceplate - or power being supplied to it (yet).
My Ring Pro attached to my door frame, but without the faceplate – or power being supplied to it (yet).

Now the moment of truth! I go to my consumer unit, press the ‘Bell’ switch on and voila!

A Ring Doorbell Pro in its initial setup mode - shown by the blue ring.
My Ring Doorbell Pro in its initial setup mode – shown by the blue ring. Phew, it works!

Step 4 – setting up the doorbell in the app

This means it’s in setup mode. I can now switch to the mobile app and finish the install there. This is all straightforward enough so I won’t cover it step-by-step, but it’s worth noting that there’s a QR code on the right hand side of the Pro (that needs to be scanned as part of the install process).

I wasn’t able to scan this when it was mounted due to my narrow doorframe, but I thankfully took a photo of this QR code beforehand – so I could just scan this off another screen at set-up time.

Anywhoo, with it all set-up, I can go into the app and view out the front of my house any time:

A screenshot from the Ring app, showing my Doorbell device's front camera view.
The front camera view from my Doorbell Pro, in the Ring app.

Summing up

Thanks for reading this article, I hope you’ve found it useful!

I don’t have tons of experience with electrics, and it’s always better to contact a qualified electrician if you’re not sure. But having said that, if you have a Deta mains voltage doorbell and you follow the steps above carefully, there’s no reason that – like me – you can’t easily install the Ring Doorbell Pro.

When reading around on this subject, I found the following resources/threads useful:

  • ElectriciansForums.net – “Ring Doorbell Pro install
  • Overclockers UK – “Help installing Ring Pro Doorbell
  • abqnm666 on Reddit’s Ring subreddit, along with threads like this and this. Thanks to abqnm666 for this help, especially with pointing out the ‘Pro Power Kit V2’ to me (as I was originally planning on leaving this out, thinking it was purely a bypass kit for existing doorbells).

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